52 Books: Weeks 3 and 4

Fine, fine, this whole ‘blog at least once a week’ malarkey has somewhat passed me by, and January’s only just sodded off. I have good reason for my absence, though: I’ve been writing way more than I’ve been reading for the past two weeks. Two brand new book ideas have leapt into fruition and I’ve been struggling to plan them and make a start on the actual writing part before the inspiration buggers off and leaves me for another several months. Usually I read while on my breaks at work because I can never get a plug socket for my laptop to do any writing, but the purchase of some very beautiful exercise books put pay to that. And on the bus I’ve been listening to podcasts (is anyone else really into podcasts all of a sudden?). I still managed to squeeze a few things in though, and the one I’m going to discuss is somewhat topical seeing as the film version just came out last week.

Room – Emma Donoghue

Start date: Thursday 28th January

End date: Saturday 30th January

Reread/New: Reread

Anyone who hasn’t read this book: please, please, go and read it immediately. I read it a few years ago, having seen a good review, and I’ve returned to it many times since then. It’s powerful, moving, and beautiful. And because of the film coming out, it’s all over bookshops right now. You have no bloody excuse.

This is the story of a five year old boy called Jack. He lives in one room, with one skylight, muffled with cork tiles and hidden behind a sinisterly beeping metal door – but he believes it’s the whole world. The pictures he sees on the TV? His mother, locked in the room with him, has told him all his life that that’s just fantasy.

Jack’s mother, known only as ‘Ma’, was kidnapped years before the story begins, and Jack himself is the product of her near-nightly rapes by her captor. It’s very obviously based on cases like Jaycee Dugard, and the three women kept prisoner by Ariel Castro.

The book is narrated by Jack himself, and although his distinctive style of childish grammar can be jarring for the first few pages, it doesn’t take long before you’re utterly immersed. Believe it or not, the story of life within the same four walls doesn’t get boring (and, spoiler alert, it doesn’t stay that way for the entire book). Jack’s innocent depiction of his daily routine is captivating and beautifully written – only on reading this for the second (or third or fourth) time could I really pick out some of the deeper nuances of Jack’s thoughts.

Even though Jack is undeniably the main character, with everything being seen through his eyes and his childlike perception, I was fascinated most by Ma. Here is this woman, captured when she was still a teenager, raising her son in a locked shed. I remember the person I was at nineteen years old: barely recognisable from the woman I am today, and not just physically. This book makes me really consider how I would have coped in that situation, and how I would have matured differently. By not giving Ma a name, the author is not only pointing out how her captor has stolen her former identity, but also seems to keep her at the point where she really could be anyone. Me, you, anyone.

That’s how I see it anyway. And I love the way Jack has to slowly come to terms with the fact that his mother, who has only ever existed to be his Ma, actually has a whole other personality beneath the surface that has been locked away for years.

I don’t want to spoil the book too much, because some sections had me turning the pages at top speed, devouring the words in an absolute state to see how things would turn out – and that was a few days ago, when I was rereading. The first time, if I remember rightly, I was a bit of a howling mess. But although there are a lot of bittersweet moments, this is a book that I will always go back to when I need inspiration, when I want to be truly uplifted.

This is the trailer for the film starring Brie Larson and Jacob Tremblay – it came out here in the UK a couple of weeks ago and I was right there at one of the first showings in Manchester. As soon as I saw it had been made into a film I knew I had to see it as soon as possible, I’ve loved the book for so long after all. I didn’t believe the film could be as good as the book, and it isn’t, but it comes pretty damn close. Somehow managing to evoke Room’s claustrophobia through Ma’s eyes, and the sense of haven it gives Jack, it’s a pretty magnificent piece of cinema. Brie Larson’s Oscar nomination is well-deserved, though I do think Jacob Tremblay should have been nominated too. Screw DiCaprio for best actor – he should have been gracefully losing to a nine year old this year.

Why are you still reading this? Go out and buy Room.

Other Books From Weeks 3 and 4

Bossypants – Tina Fey (new read)

Fabulous, fabulous biography/life manual. I didn’t want to do a full review as I did a similar thing for Caitlin Moran a couple of weeks back, but suffice to say – I love this woman. And her book. I honestly don’t know how I’ve managed not to read it until now.

The Adrian Mole Collection – Sue Townsend

Technically not one but three books; when I’m too tired to concentrate on anything new, the Adrian Mole series is one of my go-to reads. Having started at the beginning a couple of weeks back, I’m steadily working my way through the series.

Adrian Mole: The Cappuccino Years – Sue Townsend

See above. Actually, when I’ve finished my slow reread of this lot in between all the other things I’ve got going at the moment, I might do a full-series retrospective. I just can’t get enough of that anal pedant from Leicester.